News Tag: she-exports
SheChampion: women entrepreneurs from Kherson discussed new prospects on the way to international markets

The CUTIS project in cooperation with regional chambers of commerce and industry launched a series of #SheChampion seminars. The main goal is to discuss barriers women entrepreneurs face in business and international trade, as well as share experience in entering foreign markets.

The meeting, held on June 5 in Kherson, united 26 representatives including businesswomen (agriculture and food, light industry, shipbuilding and machine building), public organization representatives, and local authorities.

During the event, Vira Porovska, a Ukrainian gender expert of the CUTIS project, presented a gender based analysis (GBA) of the export challenges of Ukrainian micro, small and medium enterprises in 5 industries (apparel, footwear, confectionery, furniture, and IT services).

Larisa Ponomarenko, Head of the Kherson RCC Center for International Cooperation shared information about the CUFTA and the prospects of entering the Canadian market, its features, preferences and trends.

Victoria Gavrenkova, co-founder of companies exporting sunflower oil to more than 44 countries, including Canada, shared their experience in starting their own business and entering new markets.

Marina Nikolayeva, co-owner and director of yacht and exquisite wooden furniture company, talked about her own experience of coping with double burden, delegation and distribution of responsibilities and constant self-development.

During the masterclass in sales conducted by Vira Porovska, businesswomen exchanged advice, accumulated new ideas for improving their enterprises, shared their experience and set up new business contacts.

Similar events are planned in other regions of Ukraine. Next seminar will be in Lutsk on June 20.  So keep an eye on the updates.

SheChampion: businesswomen from Vinnytsia learned how to overcome barriers on the way to foreign markets

The CUTIS project in cooperation with regional chambers of commerce and industry launched a series of #SheChampion seminars. The main goal is to discuss barriers women entrepreneurs face in business and international trade, as well as share experience in entering foreign markets.

The meeting, held on May 30 in Vinnytsia, united 30 representatives including businesswomen, public organization representatives, and local authorities.

During the event, Barbara MacLaren, a Canadian gender expert of the CUTIS project presented a gender based analysis (GBA) of the export challenges of Ukrainian micro, small and medium enterprises in 5 industries (apparel, footwear, confectionery, furniture, and IT services).

Svitlana Vyazilovska, CEO and owner of an agriculture company Biofarm Organic, shared her experience in exporting and entering foreign markets. Svitlana selected the most interesting for the audience topics, for instance, business profitability, searching for partners, certification, logistics, etc.

During the masterclass in sales conducted by Vira Porovska, a Ukrainian gender expert of the CUTIS project, businesswomen exchanged advice, accumulated new ideas for improving their enterprises, shared their experience and set up new business contacts.

Similar events are planned in other regions of Ukraine. Next seminar will be in Kherson on June 5.  So keep an eye on the updates.

Visible and Invisible Barriers: CUTIS project convened a discussion about gender based barriers to trade

The Canada-Ukraine Trade & Investment Support (CUTIS) project presented the report ‘Visible and Invisible Barriers: a Gender Based Analysis (GBA) of the Export Challenges of Ukrainian micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs)’ at an event on May 28 in Kyiv.

The main objective of the report was to provide useful policy recommendations to stakeholders on how to lower gender-based barriers to trade for women-owned and women-managed MSMEs. A gender-based analysis was used to examine the key issues facing men and women MSME owners and top managers as they engage in international trade.

Over 100 participants took part in the event including representatives of international and non-governmental organizations, governmental institutions, academia, media, business, and other interested organizations.

The GBA was conducted by a team of academics at the Centre for Social Indicators associated with the Kyiv International Institute of Sociology (KIIS).

In total, 432 men-led MSMEs and 209 women-led MSMEs participated from five target industries – apparel, footwear, furniture, confectionery, and IT services.

This report in its gender analysis adds value to previous research on gender and trade by including the perspectives of export-oriented enterprises.

The study’s results highlight several findings that contribute to the global literature on gender and international trade:

1. Women were under-represented compared with men in terms of owning or managing an MSME. On average, only one in three companies was women-led (i.e., majority women-owned or managed). Furthermore, women-led MSMEs in four out of the five industries examined have women-dominant workforces.

2. Of the five target industries—confectionery, apparel, footwear, furniture, and IT—the highest level of women’s leadership was found in apparel, where 45 percent of surveyed MSMEs are led by women.

3. Micro and small women-led companies are slightly less likely to be currently exporting than men-owned companies of the same size. Among non-exporting businesses, we found that women-led MSMEs were less likely than those led by men to consider engaging foreign markets in the future.

4. In three of the five target industries, about half of women-led businesses that sell to domestic markets are not considering export in the future. Export barriers of concern to women-led companies are market entry and customs processes.

5. Over and above trade-related challenges, women-led MSMEs also voiced significant concern about traditional gender stereotypes and the role of women’s double burden in limiting their potential to internationalize their business.

The GBA report also includes 25 recommendations for public and private stakeholders to overcome gender-related barriers. It is our hope that these recommendations spark further discussion and action to bring about a more level playing field for men and women in international trade.

To download the report please follow this link

The Canada-Ukraine Trade and Investment Support (CUTIS) Project is a 5-year (2016-2021) Canadian development assistance initiative designed to lower poverty in Ukraine through increasing exports from Ukraine to Canada and investment from Canada to Ukraine. The project funded by the Canadian Government through the Global affairs Canada and implemented by the Conference Board of Canada in partnership with the Canada-Ukraine Chamber of Commerce.

The CUTIS project implements U CAN EXPORT Support Program in five priority sectors: clothing, footwear, furniture, confectionery, and IT services.

SheChampion: women entrepreneurs from Chernigiv discussed the barriers on the way to international markets

The CUTIS project in cooperation with regional chambers of commerce and industry launched a series of #SheChampion seminars. The main goal is to discuss barriers women entrepreneurs face in business and international trade, as well as share experience in entering foreign markets.

The first meeting, held on April 23 in Chernihiv, united more than 30 businesswomen, public organization representatives, and local authorities.

During the meeting, Vira Porovska, a gender expert of the CUTIS project presented a gender-based analysis of export barriers for small and medium-sized women businesses in 5 industries (apparel, footwear, confectionary, furniture, and IT services).

Larysa Tsygan, Vice-president of the Chernihiv Chamber of Commerce and Industry presented the useful information about the potential of the Canadian market for Ukrainian producers and overviewed the new opportunities opened by the Free Trade Agreement between Canada and Ukraine (CUFTA).

Thanks to Oksana Trukhan, owner of TM Ursula Jewelry, participants learned about the Etsy platform and its benefits for business women aiming to enter international markets.

Tetiana Lesun, the manager of Ukrposhta described new postal products for improving the export strategies of Ukrainian enterprises.

And the last but not the list. During the masterclass in sales business women exchanged advice, accumulated new ideas for improving their enterprises, shared their experience and set up new business contacts.

Similar events are planned in other regions of Ukraine. Next seminar will be in Vinnytsia on May 30. So keep an eye on the updates.

SheChampion: women entrepreneurs from Ivano-Frankivsk region discussed barriers in business and trade

Women entrepreneurship is often faced visible and/or invisible barriers. They may be related to external factors such as business development or entrance the international markets as well as internal barriers, for example, gender stereotypes in Ukrainian society.

To overcome these barriers and create a space for communication and knowledge sharing, a series of #SheChampion seminars is being organized by the CUTIS project in cooperation with regional chambers of commerce and industry.

The first meeting, held on April 11 in Ivano-Frankivsk, united more than 40 businesswomen, public organization representatives, and local authorities.

During the meeting, Vira Porovska, a gender expert of the CUTIS project presented a gender-based analysis of export barriers for small and medium-sized women businesses in 5 industries (apparel, footwear, confectionary, furniture, and IT services). Ms. Porovska also paid attention to those spheres where the number of women entrepreneurs is negligible.

Yevhen Sozansky, partner of Xtheta Management, an official partner of the Shopify platform, made an overview of international e-commerce and presented the platform’s capabilities for small business development.

Ostap Pavliuk, owner of West Trade Group (medicinal plants) shared his own experience in developing exports to new challenging markets.

Similar events are planned in other regions of Ukraine. Next seminar will be in Chernigiv. Do not miss your chance!

Webinar “Women in Business: Business Experience in Canada” was held on 26th of September

Export Promotion Office and CUTIS project run a webinar within the She Exports platform.

Topic: Women in Business: Business Development Experience in Canada

Speaker: Victoria Umin, Senior Director, International Business Development at Ag Growth International (Canada), a leading international producer of grain handling and storage equipment. Victoria has been working in the company for more than 10 years and takes a direct part in international business development. You can find more here https://www.linkedin.com/in/victoria-umin-8bb51711/.

What issues were considered?

  1. What skills should be developed in the modern business in connection with global trends?
  2. What needs to change in business to be effective in the modern economy?
  3. What practical business development tips can you give?
  4. What to consider in the export plan for entering the Canadian market?
  5. Practical advice for women entrepreneurs, based on experience in Ukraine, Canada and other countries.

 You can find the video here https://bit.ly/2EHRUKe 

Contact person Alina Sevastyuk alinasevastyuk@epo.org.ua, +380674628282.

Want to learn more about exports to Canada? You can download the Step by Step Guide for free at https://cutisproject.org/success/icanexport/

Entrepreneurs in Khmelnytsky and Ivano-Frankivsk discussed opportunities for entering the international markets

On March 27 and April 2 in Khmelnytsky and Ivano-Frankivsk events from the series of world business-cafes “Women Entrepreneurship: Access to Foreign Markets” initiated by the Export Promotion Office under the Ministry of Economic Development and Trade took place.

Meetings for women in business were held at the local Chambers of Commerce and Industry with the assistance of the Canadian-Ukrainian Trade and Investment Promotion Project (CUTIS).

Within the business cafe, women entrepreneurs listened to an informational lecture on the opportunities created by the Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement, and also had a “brainstorming” session covering the following questions:

  • What are the barriers preventing their businesses from exporting?
  • What export support services are needed to overcome these obstacles?
  • What is the best way to provide export support services?
  • Who can provide these services?

As a result of the discussion, the participants formulated practical tips that could help businesses increase their chances of entering international markets, and also exchange their observations and experiences on overcoming the existing barriers for women entrepreneurs.

Follow the announcements for the future events here.

More photos below.

Women entrepreneurs from Kropyvnytskyi learned about entering foreign markets

On March 2, 2018, as part of the World Business Cafe “Women’s Entrepreneurship: Access to Foreign Markets” the issue of Ukrainian women-led businesses entering foreign markets was discussed at the Kirovograd Regional Chamber of Commerce and Industry (KRCCI).

About 20 female entrepreneurs from Kirovograd region (representatives of small and medium businesses of the region) took part in the event organized by the Canada-Ukraine Trade and Investment Promotion (CUTIS) project. The co-organizer of the event was the Export Promotion Office under the Ministry of Economic Development of Ukraine and KRCCI.

The President of the KRCCI Iryna Sayenko addressed the participants of the event with welcoming remarks, emphasizing the Chamber’s full support of women entrepreneurship.

The CUTIS Project Manager Konstantin Ryzhkov familiarized the participants with the work of the project and invited them to engage in all the possible activities aimed at the development of female entrepreneurship.

The issue of exporting Ukrainian goods to Canada in the context of the Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement, as well as the prospects and challenges for women entrepreneurs was highlighted by Oleksandra Brovko, CUTIS project Senior Trade and Investment Policy expert.

The work of the World Business Cafe was divided into so-called rounds. The first round focused on discussing specific barriers to export development for women-owned companies. The second round covered the export support services needed to overcome these obstacles. The third one was devoted to the best ways of providing export support services, as well as service providers or interested parties who can provide those services. During the fourth round, the discussion reports were prepared. At the end of the event, the participants presented the results of the discussion and, together with the experts, summarized the main findings.

Source: Kirovograd Regional Chamber of Commerce and Industry (KRCCI)

Women-entrepreneurs in Lutsk discussed the trade barriers for entering international markets

On February 12, an interactive world business-cafe “Women’s Entrepreneurship: Access to Foreign Markets” was held in Lutsk, organized by the Canadian-Ukrainian Trade and Investment Support Project, Export Promotion Office and the Volyn Chamber of Commerce and Industry within the #SheExports platform.

Active representatives of the export-oriented women’s business from the Volyn region joined the event. Within the business cafe CUTIS project expert Oleksandra Brovko presented them with useful information about the potential of the Canadian market for Ukrainian producers. Participants also learned about the She Exports platform and its benefits for business women aiming to enter international markets.

In addition, while working in small groups, participants were looking for the answers to important questions for female exporters:

  • what are the barriers to the export development of their companies;
  • what export support services are needed to overcome these obstacles;
  • which export support format is the best;
  • who can provide those services.

In the process of brainstorm and presentation of the group work results, the exporter exchanged advice, accumulated new ideas for improving the export strategies of their enterprises, shared their experience and set up new business contacts.

Similar events are planned in other regions of Ukraine, so keep an eye on the updates.

Opinion: 5 reasons why gender equality in trade matters

Can trade benefit from increased participation of women? And, as we undertake efforts to achieve gender equality under the objectives of the United Nations Global Goals, is trade good for women?

As the world business organization we believe the answer to these questions is a resounding “yes”.

Here we put forward five reasons why gender is good for trade and highlight some of the barriers preventing women business owners from accessing international markets.

1 – Women in trade supports better jobs

According to research by the International Trade Centre (ITC), women-owned businesses that export employ an average of 42 people, compared with an average of only eight people employed by non-exporting women-owned businesses. Despite this, woman exporters face more trade obstacles than men, with 74% of woman-owned firms reporting challenging non-tariff measures compared to 54% of businesses owned by men. WTO Director-General Roberto Azevedo said: “WTO Action is needed to better integrate women into the international trading system. All the evidence suggests that giving an equal economic chance to women is not only economically important; it results in beneficial outcomes for society as a whole.”

2 – Exporters pay better too…

The average pay by exporting women-owned businesses is over one-and-a-half times higher than the average pay of women-owned businesses that do not trade. All the more reason to take action to eliminate the stifling trade finance gap that women entrepreneurs in emerging markets face. ITC research shows this gap to be around US$260-320 billion per year. Speaking earlier this year at the International Forum on Women and Trade, EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom said: “Each woman who can benefit from trade is a woman who can open new markets and new opportunities, can sell and spread her ideas, and support her community and sometimes her whole village.”

3 – … and are more productive too!

Women-owned businesses that export are 3.5 times more productive than those which do not export. But while women own up to 40% of all small- and medium-sized enterprises globally, they lead only one in five exporting firms.
Frank Matsaert, CEO of TradeMark East Africa said: “70% of cross border traders in East Africa are women, meaning targeted intervention to enhance their trading opportunities is economically beneficial to the region.”

4 – Mind the gap

Research by Facebook, OECD and The World Bank suggests that online tools are used for significantly more purposes by women business owners than men. According to Intel Corporation’s Women and the Web report bringing women online would contribute up to USD 18 billion to the annual GDP of 144 developing countries. Yet, in this digital age, women have less access than men to the Internet in many countries. Estimates for 2016 point to a 12% gender gap, which jumps to 31% for least developed countries.

5 – A boost for the global economy

ITC Executive Director Arancha Gonzalez said: “Women and international trade is no longer the proverbial elephant in the room…If we are going to help push global growth, eradicate extreme poverty and create sustainable jobs we have to not only move this topic centre stage – we need to make it actionable.”

According to research by McKinsey, advancing women’s equality could add $28 trillion to global GDP by 2025 and mean better development outcomes for families and communities worldwide. We believe facilitating the active participation of women in trade must be part of this pursuit given that women-owned export businesses report average sales of US$ 16.3 million, compared with US$816,000 for non-exporting women-owned businesses.

ICC Secretary General John Danilovich said: “Levelling the playing field for women to access international markets is not only the right thing to do but also the ‘smart thing’ to do for development, economic growth and business.”

Source: International Chamber of Commerce