News Tag: exports to Canada
The Do’s and Don’ts of Canadian Business Culture – a virtual round table

The CUTIS project and the Canada-Ukraine Chamber of Commerce (CUCC) held a virtual round table for small and medium-sized businesses.

SMEs learned how socially responsible business best practices can help SMEs to develop long-lasting relationships with Canadian business partners.

Maria Guzman, Trade Facilitation Office (TFO)’s International Trade Expert, explained:

  • How to build trust and sustainable business relations with Canadian buyers?
  • With cultural differences among buyers, what makes Canadian buyers unique compared to EU and US buyers?
  • Dos and Don’ts in communicating with Canadian buyers: Learning from experience

Download Maria’s presentation

Michael Hopkins, International CSR Expert, Director of MHC International Ltd, discussed CSR standards and best examples in FMCG (fast-moving consumer goods) sectors in North America.

The participants may learn:

  • What are the three main factors that buyers look for in potential suppliers?
  • What are the business risks of ignoring CSR?
  • Does CSR help to differentiate a supplier’s product brand?

Download Michael’s presentation

Olga Shtepa, CUTIS project coordinator, described what are the main lessons learned for Ukrainian SMEs in dealing with Canadian buyers (based on CUTIS experience)?

Moreover, Ukrainian SMEs who have already successfully implemented CSR practices shared their stories of entering new markets and dealing with international buyers’ audits.

Emma Turos, Managing Director of the Canada-Ukraine Chamber of Commerce, described the benefits of CUCC business practices and services for members and supporters on the Canadian market.

Ukrainian companies may attend two North American apparel virtual trade shows for free

The Apparel Textile Sourcing (ATS) exhibition, one of the largest international apparel and textile sourcing events, will connect thousands of buyers and manufacturers from all over the world with two virtual trade shows.

The virtual events will take place live online on October 26-30 and November 16-20. These state-of-the-art digital events will connect more than 300 manufacturers and suppliers from over a dozen countries and regions with attendees and buyers from Canada, the USA, Latin America, Europe, Australia.

Ukrainian companies may attend the trade shows FOR FREE.

The ATS October 26-30 event will have an educational and market focus on global and Canadian trade issues with special attention on free trade agreements, sustainability and COVID-19.

The ATS November 16-20 event will feature panels and sessions focused on global suppliers and USA buyers. Analysts, economists, influencers and experts will recap 2020 and provide advantages to seek out in 2021.

The attendances will get:

  • Free sourcing, education, matchmaking & more.
  • Interactive seminars from apparel & sourcing industry experts.
  • Exhibits from North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia & the Middle East.
  • Live chats, virtual networking, engagement made simple.

To get more information and register, please follow the link.

Apparel Textile Sourcing trade shows are a global industry destination that provides a unique platform for manufacturers, distributors, apparel & fabric buyers, merchandisers, retail chains to find new business contacts, share experiences, learn new ideas and create business opportunities.

Ukrainian apparel products were presented at ATSC three times and caught the interest of Indian, Chinese and Pakistani companies, which considered the possibility of locating production capacity in Ukraine.

For the first time in a virtual format. Ukrainian confectioners take part in the largest North American food exhibition

Two well-known Ukrainian food producers – Bob Snail (natural candies “Snail Bob”) and Malbi (chocolate products “Millennium”) represent Ukraine at SIAL Canada 2020, the largest exhibition of food, equipment and technology in North America.

From September 28 to October 2, SIAL Canada will be a unique virtual platform for communication between leading players of the North American agri-food market.

Ukraine will be represented at SIAL Canada for the third time. This year, for the first time, Ukrainian manufacturers are getting acquainted with Canadian and American consumers and buyers in an innovative virtual format. Such participation became possible through the support of the CUTIS project and the Canada-Ukraine Chamber of Commerce (CUCC).

Ukrainian companies are presented at the exhibition via customized 3D stands, where future Canadian and American partners may get all the necessary information for further cooperation. Besides, a series of B2B meetings are planned with key Canadian distributors and retailers.

In total, according to the organizers, more than 25 thousand visitors will take part in the virtual exhibition, more than 1.5 thousand B2B meetings will be held.

“Pioneering in the new online world and participating in such virtual shows like SIAL 2020 in Montreal, CUTIS project mobilized the Ukrainian companies which are capable to make a contribution to the economic recovery of our industry and export. We explore opportunities for the new format of communication and reenergize entrepreneurship,” Emma Turos, Managing Director at CUCC and Project Manager at CUTIS project, say.

“It is nice to mention that CUTIS and CUCC are helping Ukrainian businesses to adapt to the new business reality and find new partners overseas. In conditions when the borders between counties are actually closed. Such activities contribute to the development of not only specific companies but also the entire food industry and the economy of Ukraine in general, ” Ms. Emma continues.

Ukrainian confectionery producers present their products at SIAL Canada for the third time as a part of the CUTIS U CAN EXPORT support program for Ukrainian SMEs. We are confident that, as in previous years, Ukrainian products will receive positive reviews from demanding Canadian retailers and distributors.

Stay tuned!

Top-5 interesting facts about international trade between Canada and Ukraine

The Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement came into force on August 1, 2017. Starting from August 2017, Ukraine eliminated import duties on more than 70% of imports from Canada.

For other agricultural and industrial products, Ukraine will gradually open its market over transitional periods of 3, 5 or 7 years. Canada immediately eliminated tariffs on 98% of Ukrainian goods.

What are the main results for businesses in targeted sectors after three years of free trade between Canada and Ukraine?

  1. Canada’s exports to Ukraine with the largest increases include fish and seafood, machinery and mechanical appliances, motor vehicles and parts, meat, and electronics. For example, in June 2020, Ukraine was the fourth‑largest destination by volume for Canadian fish and seafood exports.
  2.  In 2019, Canada supplied 70% of Ukraine’s total imports of frozen crustaceans, cold‑water shrimps and prawns.
  3. In 2019, Ukraine also imported from Canada almost half of the prepared cranberries (46% of total imports) and 20% of diamonds.
  4. Canada’s imports from Ukraine that have expanded the most include iron and steel, electronics, and preparations of vegetables.
  5. Ukraine supplied 26% of Canada’s total imports of apple juice and 6% of snow‑skis in 2019.

According to Canadian experts, Canadian businesses that produce vehicles, engines, turbines, airplanes and turbo‑jets, petroleum gases, ethylene polymers, rubber, wood pulp, and meat have the strong economical potential in Ukraine.

At the same time, Canada offers more competitive prices for Ukrainian companies producing air conditioners, unwrought silver, cobalt, uncoated paper and paperboard, narrow woven fabrics, machinery and parts, fork‑lifts and other work trucks.

You can find more information via the link.

How to prepare for a virtual trading mission – video

The COVID-19 epidemic is making adjustments to export activities. Traditional personal communication during industry events or trade missions is replaced with virtual video conferencing, messengers and online platforms. This is where significant benefits for Ukrainian producers appear.

Why won’t the virtual format of meetings disappear after the end of the epidemic? The reason is obvious: it is beneficial to meet online given the saving of time and money.

A properly prepared and successfully conducted virtual meeting is a guarantee of mutually beneficial business relations in the future. Everything is like in a theatre here: you have to dedicate a lot of time, sweat and blood in preparation, training and coaching to enjoy a moment of glory on stage in the spotlight.

Olga Shtepa, CUTIS project coordinator, who has huge experience in organizing virtual negotiations with Canadian business, explains how to properly prepare for participation in a virtual trade mission and what kind of challenges you may face (in Ukrainian).

How to systemize your business. Practical advice for SMEs – webinar

The CUTIS project, in partnership with the Canada-Ukraine Chamber of Commerce, held a  webinar with Colleen Krebs, Manager of Business Services, Women’s Enterprise Centre of Manitoba (Canada).

Colleen Krebs completed her bachelor’s degree in marketing and immediately launched her entrepreneurial pursuits in the coffee, construction, and renovation industries. She operated a successful café for over eight years managing all aspects of the business including product/service development, H/R, sales, operations planning, and inventory management.

In 2008 Colleen joined the Women’s Enterprise Centre of Manitoba where she is currently Manager of Business Services. She continues to inspire and motivate women to pursue their own entrepreneurial dreams by drawing upon her expertise as a skilled facilitator, business advisor, and passionate interpersonal connector.

You can download Colleen’s presentation via the link 

During the webinar participants:

  • Understood what systems are and why they are critical to your business success
  • Understood the benefits of having a systemized business
  • Understood how integrating systems affect business outcomes
  • Learnt more about the mindset and approach entrepreneurs should adopt when apply change to their business
  • Walked though the “how to” implement systems that stick.

Covid effect as a window of opportunity for Ukrainian exporters in Canada

The Сovid effect turned out to be equally unexpected and devastating for all countries of the world without exception, including Canada and Ukraine. It is known, however, that every stick has two ends, that is, thanks to the dangerous virus, all countries and manufacturers are on equal terms and have the same restrictions.

Life does not stop and the need for good-quality goods, clothes, shoes, food, furniture, etc. cannot be cancelled. The demand, of course, changes, transforms, sometimes decreases, sometimes, on the contrary, increases.

Preference is given to the products that are produced locally, or elsewhere, better not in China (but at Chinese prices!). This is a consequence of the aggravation of economic relations with China recently, on the one hand, and the desire to try something new, on the other hand.

According to many experts, consumers are even willing to pay more for local products.

Traditional personal communication during industry events or trade missions is replaced with virtual video conferencing, messengers and online platforms. This is where significant benefits for Ukrainian producers appear.

First, Ukrainian goods are trusted in the local Canadian market due to the large diaspora.

Second, what is produced in Ukraine is a kind of synonym for what is produced in Europe. Hence the respect and understanding that production is based on international and European social and environmental standards – without the use of child labor or uncertified raw materials. The focus of Ukrainian manufacturers on European trends and the latest fashion innovations also remains important.

All this taken together opens a wider window of opportunity for Ukrainian exporters to Canada, which is worth taking advantage of. Canadian buyers are interested in finding reliable business partners in Ukraine.

That is why a properly prepared and successfully conducted virtual meeting is a guarantee of mutually beneficial business relations in the future. Everything is like in a theater here: you have to dedicate a lot of time, sweat and blood in preparation, training and coaching to enjoy a moment of glory on stage in the spotlight.

Why won’t the virtual format of meetings disappear after the end of the epidemic?

The reason is obvious: it is beneficial to meet online given the saving of time and money.

Although the virtual format will in no way replace live communication, we advise you to learn this know-how and use it more actively in your business communications.

Author: Olga Shtepa, CUTIS project coordinator 

The CUTIS project improves government officials’ knowledge of international investment law

The CUTIS project held a 2-day webinar for government officials on international investment law.

The speaker – J. Anthony VanDuzer, Hyman Soloway Professor of Business and Trade Law, University of Ottawa.

The webinar provided an overview of the international investment regime, including bilateral investment treaties and investment chapters in free trade agreements, and current reform discussions. The emphasis was on policy implications rather than the technical detail of investment treaty provisions.

The first day was devoted to the substantive investor protection standards and investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) arrangements in existing investment treaties along with a discussion of treaty practise and the issues that have arisen in practice.

Canada’s treaty practice and ISDS experience were used as a case study.

The second day was addressed possible reforms to investor protection standards and ISDS. The speaker canvassed treaty drafting strategies that are designed to better balance investor protection with the host state’s right to regulate compared to traditional treaty protections as well as alternatives to investment treaty protection. He also covered proposals for ISDS reform focussing on the reforms currently being discussed in UNCITRAL Working Group III, including the EU proposal for a multilateral investment court.

How to export organic to Canada – webinar

The CUTIS project, in cooperation with the Export Promotion Office and Organic Ukraine association, held a series of webinars for Ukrainian organic producers who are interested in exporting to new markets, including the Canadian market. More than 40 organic companies participated in the event.

Why may Canada be attractive to Ukrainian organic producers? North America remains a leader in the consumption of organics. The United States occupies the first place with the rest of the world considerably lagging. Canada, with 3 billion euros of its organic market volume, ranks sixth in the global ranking.

During the event, CUTIS project experts and the Canada Organic Trade Association talked about the main features of successful organic exports to the Canadian market. Export Promotion Office team describes how to use helpful tools for finding and analyzing new markets.

Oleksandra Brovko, CUTIS Ukrainian Senior Trade Policy Expert, analyzed regulatory requirements for exporting organic products to Canada under the Free Trade Agreement between countries. Oleksandra also focused on the importance of labelling requirements for organic products in the Canadian market (download the presentation).

Zoia Pavlenko, CUTIS Environmental Expert, spoke about the specifics of the Canadian organic market and drew participants’ attention to the product groups that are most favoured among Canadian consumers (download the presentation).

Tia Loftsgard, Executive Director of the Organic Trade Association of Canada, described the Canadian organic market structure. Besides, she talked about consumer preferences and organic certification for the Canadian market (download the presentation).

Webinar recording 

 

Rules of origin for apparel and footwear under the CUFTA – video

In order to obtain preferential access to the Canadian market under the Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement (CUFTA), the product must be of Ukrainian origin.

The rules of origin impact on:

  • Import duty rates
  • Tariff quotas
  • Export trade statistics

It is essential to know that a declaration of origin of the goods is the only document Ukrainian producer needs to confirm the origin.

What does this mean for Ukrainian business?

Ukrainian companies don’t have to receive any additional certificates. The origin information shall be indicated on an invoice or any other document containing the description of the goods. Therefore, it means reducing financial and time costs for customs clearance of export products.

You can find out more about rules of origin for Ukrainian apparel and footwear goods under the CUFTA from Olexandra Brovko, CUTIS Senior Expert on Trade and Investment.

To free download the manual – I CAN Export: Rules of origin under the Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement. Guidelines for Exporters (in Ukrainian), please follow the link.