News Tag: CUFTA
Top-5 interesting facts about international trade between Canada and Ukraine

The Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement came into force on August 1, 2017. Starting from August 2017, Ukraine eliminated import duties on more than 70% of imports from Canada.

For other agricultural and industrial products, Ukraine will gradually open its market over transitional periods of 3, 5 or 7 years. Canada immediately eliminated tariffs on 98% of Ukrainian goods.

What are the main results for businesses in targeted sectors after three years of free trade between Canada and Ukraine?

  1. Canada’s exports to Ukraine with the largest increases include fish and seafood, machinery and mechanical appliances, motor vehicles and parts, meat, and electronics. For example, in June 2020, Ukraine was the fourth‑largest destination by volume for Canadian fish and seafood exports.
  2.  In 2019, Canada supplied 70% of Ukraine’s total imports of frozen crustaceans, cold‑water shrimps and prawns.
  3. In 2019, Ukraine also imported from Canada almost half of the prepared cranberries (46% of total imports) and 20% of diamonds.
  4. Canada’s imports from Ukraine that have expanded the most include iron and steel, electronics, and preparations of vegetables.
  5. Ukraine supplied 26% of Canada’s total imports of apple juice and 6% of snow‑skis in 2019.

According to Canadian experts, Canadian businesses that produce vehicles, engines, turbines, airplanes and turbo‑jets, petroleum gases, ethylene polymers, rubber, wood pulp, and meat have the strong economical potential in Ukraine.

At the same time, Canada offers more competitive prices for Ukrainian companies producing air conditioners, unwrought silver, cobalt, uncoated paper and paperboard, narrow woven fabrics, machinery and parts, fork‑lifts and other work trucks.

You can find more information via the link.

How to prepare for a virtual trading mission – video

The COVID-19 epidemic is making adjustments to export activities. Traditional personal communication during industry events or trade missions is replaced with virtual video conferencing, messengers and online platforms. This is where significant benefits for Ukrainian producers appear.

Why won’t the virtual format of meetings disappear after the end of the epidemic? The reason is obvious: it is beneficial to meet online given the saving of time and money.

A properly prepared and successfully conducted virtual meeting is a guarantee of mutually beneficial business relations in the future. Everything is like in a theatre here: you have to dedicate a lot of time, sweat and blood in preparation, training and coaching to enjoy a moment of glory on stage in the spotlight.

Olga Shtepa, CUTIS project coordinator, who has huge experience in organizing virtual negotiations with Canadian business, explains how to properly prepare for participation in a virtual trade mission and what kind of challenges you may face (in Ukrainian).

Covid effect as a window of opportunity for Ukrainian exporters in Canada

The Сovid effect turned out to be equally unexpected and devastating for all countries of the world without exception, including Canada and Ukraine. It is known, however, that every stick has two ends, that is, thanks to the dangerous virus, all countries and manufacturers are on equal terms and have the same restrictions.

Life does not stop and the need for good-quality goods, clothes, shoes, food, furniture, etc. cannot be cancelled. The demand, of course, changes, transforms, sometimes decreases, sometimes, on the contrary, increases.

Preference is given to the products that are produced locally, or elsewhere, better not in China (but at Chinese prices!). This is a consequence of the aggravation of economic relations with China recently, on the one hand, and the desire to try something new, on the other hand.

According to many experts, consumers are even willing to pay more for local products.

Traditional personal communication during industry events or trade missions is replaced with virtual video conferencing, messengers and online platforms. This is where significant benefits for Ukrainian producers appear.

First, Ukrainian goods are trusted in the local Canadian market due to the large diaspora.

Second, what is produced in Ukraine is a kind of synonym for what is produced in Europe. Hence the respect and understanding that production is based on international and European social and environmental standards – without the use of child labor or uncertified raw materials. The focus of Ukrainian manufacturers on European trends and the latest fashion innovations also remains important.

All this taken together opens a wider window of opportunity for Ukrainian exporters to Canada, which is worth taking advantage of. Canadian buyers are interested in finding reliable business partners in Ukraine.

That is why a properly prepared and successfully conducted virtual meeting is a guarantee of mutually beneficial business relations in the future. Everything is like in a theater here: you have to dedicate a lot of time, sweat and blood in preparation, training and coaching to enjoy a moment of glory on stage in the spotlight.

Why won’t the virtual format of meetings disappear after the end of the epidemic?

The reason is obvious: it is beneficial to meet online given the saving of time and money.

Although the virtual format will in no way replace live communication, we advise you to learn this know-how and use it more actively in your business communications.

Author: Olga Shtepa, CUTIS project coordinator 

The CUTIS project improves government officials’ knowledge of international investment law

The CUTIS project held a 2-day webinar for government officials on international investment law.

The speaker – J. Anthony VanDuzer, Hyman Soloway Professor of Business and Trade Law, University of Ottawa.

The webinar provided an overview of the international investment regime, including bilateral investment treaties and investment chapters in free trade agreements, and current reform discussions. The emphasis was on policy implications rather than the technical detail of investment treaty provisions.

The first day was devoted to the substantive investor protection standards and investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) arrangements in existing investment treaties along with a discussion of treaty practise and the issues that have arisen in practice.

Canada’s treaty practice and ISDS experience were used as a case study.

The second day was addressed possible reforms to investor protection standards and ISDS. The speaker canvassed treaty drafting strategies that are designed to better balance investor protection with the host state’s right to regulate compared to traditional treaty protections as well as alternatives to investment treaty protection. He also covered proposals for ISDS reform focussing on the reforms currently being discussed in UNCITRAL Working Group III, including the EU proposal for a multilateral investment court.

CUTIS buttresses the development of Ukrainian exports and trade in services

Trade in services is a dynamic area where new and non-conventional negotiating instruments and techniques emerge (e.g., ‘negative’ and ‘hybrid’ listing approaches, ‘standstill’ and ‘ratchet’ clauses, etc.). Therefore, it is vitally crucial for Ukrainian services negotiators to strengthen their negotiating capacities and skills with the new/emerging negotiating instruments and techniques.

On May 22, the CUTIS project held a webinar for government officials on negative listing scheduling techniques in trade in services.

The event is intended to refresh participants’ memory of how services are traded and delve into the peculiarities of the ‘negative listing’ technique, which is new for Ukraine.

The webinar was addressed by Pietro Poretti, an independent trade consultant, a member of the Secretariat of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) and a participant in the negotiation process of free trade agreements in the past.

Pietro provided the participants with the knowledge and techniques to schedule commitments for service sectors or sub-sectors under the so-called ‘negative listing approach’. He drew the difference between ‘positive’ list (traditional under the GATS), ‘negative’ list (e.g., CETA), and ‘hybrid’ approach (e.g., TiSA).

The CUTIS project expects that new knowledge prepare Ukrainian officials for the negotiations on services as well as to buttress the capacity of Ukraine’s representatives in current FTAs negotiations with other countries.

How to export IT services to Canada – webinar

The Greater Toronto Area is considered to be one of the world’s main high-tech hubs rated next to the Silicon Valley of California, Boston, Seattle and Washington in the United States.

There is a growing demand for IT professionals in the Canadian market. Approximately 216,000 new jobs will be created in the sector by the end of the year 2021. Due to immigration and the involvement of students from Canadian universities, the country will be able to meet only 30% of these needs.

Thus, the conclusion is obvious: Canadian companies will look for opportunities to attract foreign professionals and companies. And this is an excellent chance for Ukraine!

The CUTIS project and the Canada-Ukraine Chamber of Commerce hold a webinar “Export of IT services to Canada: presentation of the export manual and recommendations from practitioners.” Information partner of the event – IT Ukraine Association.

Maxim Boroda, CUTIS Ukrainian Senior Trade Analysis Expert, told about key parameters and trends in the Canadian ICT market (download the presentation).  

Oleksandra Brovko, CUTIS Ukrainian Senior Trade Policy Expert, analyzed the main conditions and requirements for the export of IT services to Canada (download the presentation).

Features of Canadian business culture and marketing activities in Canada were discussed during the presentation of Olga Shtepa, CUTIS Ukrainian Project Coordinator (download the presentation).

John de Boer, SecDev Group Principal, paid attention to new opportunities for the Ukrainian companies in the Canadian IT market in the time of COVID-19 (download the presentation).

Igor Volzhanin, СЕО DataSine, shared his experience in fundraising, business culture and digital customer acquisition (download the presentation).

📌 Download the guide “I Can Export: How to export information and communication technology (ICT) services to Canada” via the link (in Ukrainian).

Practical recommendation to establish successful business relationships with Canadian buyers – webinar

The CUTIS project in partnership with the Canada-Ukraine Chamber of Commerce and the Canada Export Promotion Office (TFO Canada) held a webinar with the participation of Maria Guzman, TFO Canada apparel market expert and CUTIS projects consultant.

The main objective is to provide comprehensive and practical guidance on the requirements for the sale of clothing in Canada and to facilitate the process of finding partners in this market for Ukrainian companies.

The following questions were discussed during the webinar:

  • Features of the Canadian clothing market
  • Recent fashion trends in the market
  • How to interact with potential buyers
  • How to successfully build a business relationship
  • How to present your product successfully
  • How to calculate export prices and negotiate with Bayer
  • How to calculate the cost of logistics
  • Basic requirements for product labelling

Part 1 video 

Part 2 video 

You can download Maria’s presentation via the link.

You can download the webinar Summary via the link.

Rules of origin for apparel and footwear under the CUFTA – video

In order to obtain preferential access to the Canadian market under the Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement (CUFTA), the product must be of Ukrainian origin.

The rules of origin impact on:

  • Import duty rates
  • Tariff quotas
  • Export trade statistics

It is essential to know that a declaration of origin of the goods is the only document Ukrainian producer needs to confirm the origin.

What does this mean for Ukrainian business?

Ukrainian companies don’t have to receive any additional certificates. The origin information shall be indicated on an invoice or any other document containing the description of the goods. Therefore, it means reducing financial and time costs for customs clearance of export products.

You can find out more about rules of origin for Ukrainian apparel and footwear goods under the CUFTA from Olexandra Brovko, CUTIS Senior Expert on Trade and Investment.

To free download the manual – I CAN Export: Rules of origin under the Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement. Guidelines for Exporters (in Ukrainian), please follow the link.

Resource World Magazine highlighted mining in Ukraine

Resource World Magazine – one of the leading media in the business of mining, oil, gas and green technologies with subscribers in 46 countries published the outputs of the Mining in Ukraine conference, organized by CUTIS Project and the Canada-Ukraine Chamber of Commerce (CUCC) within the framework of PDAC Convention on March 2nd, 2020 in Toronto.

The editor Ellsworth Dickson wrote an article about activities of the state-owned Ukrainian exploration company “Nadra Ukrayny”, represented at the conference by the Chairman Taras Kuzmych.

Please read the whole article below:

Ukraine state exploration company seeking partners

By Ellsworth Dickson

In a presentation at the recent Prospectors and Developers of Canada Convention in Toronto, Canada, Taras Kuzmych, Chairman of National Joint Stock Company (NJSC), Nadra Ukrany, outlined the many activities of the state-owned Ukrainian exploration company.

The company carries out geological exploration and invests in projects in the exploration and production sector in the country – mostly oil and gas projects but some mineral projects as well.

Although Nadra Ukrany has been in existence in one form or another for about 80 years, the current state company was formed in 2000 “….to improve minerals supply for country’s needs [and] to reserve and increase geological enterprises’ potential.”

Considering the tumultuous events Ukraine has had to endure during the 20th century, it is remarkable that the NJSC has explored over 1,800 oil fields, discovered over 350 hydrocarbon deposits, drilled over 1,000 wells and added 2.9 billion tons of fuel reserves with the result that both state-owned and private enterprises represent about 95% of hydrocarbons in Ukraine.

The company has noted that these include hundreds of oil and condensate deposits such as: Shebelinske, Yablunivske, Radchenkivske, Sahaydatske, Mihaylivske, Rybalske, Anastasiyivske that have been discovered, tested and put into operation.

Recently, the NJSC has been modernizing its corporate structure and auditing its Joint Activity Agreements. The company is currently offering a selection of blocks, minerals and cooperating frameworks to investors covering the entire country. Bidding by investors is competition based.

For the oil & gas sector, the NJSC is involved in geological exploration, field development and analysis of wells, environmental monitoring and impact analysis R&D, laboratory studies of core, drilling mud and related activities, including engineering and geological research.

Nadra Ukrany has also been involved with exploring and developing various mineral commodities, including the Dashukivske clay deposit, Muzhiyivske gold and polymetallic ore deposit, coal deposits of the Lviv-Volyn coal basin, native sulphur and potassium salt deposits in the Carpathian region of Ukraine, the Dnieper brown coal basin, the Klintsy native gold deposit (the first Ukrainian gold was extracted out of its ore), and even mineral waters as Naftusya, Morshinska, Polyana Kwasova and Shayanska, as well as numerous deposits of decorative and construction brick.

There are several ways foreign investors can participate such as a Production Sharing Agreement (PSA), a Production Enhancement Contract and Joint Activity.

One example that is available is a farm-in PSA opportunity in the Oleska Oil and Gas Project in western Ukraine. This would involve E&P of conventional and unconventional hydrocarbons. Other oil & gas opportunities are also available.

There are also partnership opportunities for mineral development as well, including titanium in the Zhytomyr region, zirconium in the Krasnorichenske ilmenite field and zirconium, vanadium and scandium in the Paromivske ilmenite field. Scandium is a rare and valuable metal capable of increasing the strength of aluminum to that of steel, making the alloy especially useful for aircraft applications.

Blessed with petroleum and mineral wealth, Ukraine is keen on developing its natural resources and is welcoming foreign investors to participate in a variety of projects.

New opportunities for foreign investors in the Ukrainian mining industry were presented in Canada

Prospectors & Developers Association of Canada (PDAC) Convention in Toronto is the world’s annual premier mining industry event, bringing together investors, analysts, mining executives, geologists, students, and government officials.

Attendance at the 88th PDAC 2020 Convention totaled 23,144, highlighting the resilience and innovation of the international mineral exploration and mining sector.

Over 132 countries were present at PDAC, including major mining companies from the United States, Canada, China, Brazil, Australia, India, and South Africa.

For the first time within the PDAC agenda, Canada Ukraine Trade and Investment Support Project (CUTIS) in conjunction with the Canada-Ukraine Chamber of Commerce (CUCC) organized a half-day event called “Mining in Ukraine”. Ukrainian State and private mining representatives, as well as Canadian and American mining companies doing business in Ukraine presented to over 80 potential investors. The speakers shared their knowledge about the Ukraine mining industry and potential opportunities.

Roman Opimakh, who serves as the Head of the State Service for Geology and Subsoil of Ukraine was one of the first Ukrainian government speakers. Opimakh highlighted that Ukraine is on its way of transforming State Service for Geology into the service-oriented agency. The plan is to restore trust in the agency by improving the efficiency of its operations and creating investment opportunities for foreign companies. The agency is currently working towards activating “dormant” licenses and lifting artificial regulatory barriers. To attract investments in the development of the Ukrainian mineral sector, the agency is improving access to the existing geological data and conducting e-auctions and PSA tender for mineral projects.

The next speaker, Matt Simpson, CEO of Canadian company Black Iron Inc., a publicly listed company on the TSX, provided an overview of the company’s Shymanivske Iron Ore Project located in Ukraine’s iron belt 8km from Kryvyi Rih, the city with 750,000 people. The site is 2 km from rail, 30 km from power and will have access to 5 ports – 230 km to 430 km from the site. Matt Simpson said that they will need to invest US$436 million for the construction of the mine and plan to produce 4 million tonnes per year of premium 68% iron ore product. The production is scheduled to begin in late 2022. The Company is working closely with the Government of Ukraine to get all the necessary approvals to begin construction. If the project is successful, Matt Simpson predicts that it will generate US$1.2 billion investment over the next 20 years.

Brian C. Savage, Chairman and CEO of Avellana Gold Ltd. a privately held mineral exploration and development company, provided an overview of its development activities in Ukraine. The company owns licenses for gold-polymetallic deposits located in the western, Transcarpathian region of Ukraine near the border with Romania and Hungary. The three licenses cover over 1,300 hectares of land. The company has completed a 3d resource model and is developing a life of mine plan that targets 1 million tonnes of underground mining. Brian Savage said that it will take another two years to bring the project into the production of gold and zinc.

Chairman of the Board of NJSC “Nadra of Ukraine” Taras Kuzmych presented the opportunities of cooperation with NJSC “Nadra of Ukraine”. In particular, Taras Kuzmych outlined the plans for the transformation of NJSC “Nadra of Ukraine” and on specific proposals for cooperation in the field of development of minerals.  In addition to presenting these potential investment projects, Taras Kuzmych stressed the readiness of NJSC “Nadra Ukrainy”, which has vast experience and local expertise, to assist foreign companies entering Ukraine.

Taras Kuzmych presented a detailed brief on frameworks of cooperation with NJSC “Nadra Ukraine” in the joint development of blocks. In particular, it can be conducted on the basis of Production Sharing Agreements (PSAs), Production Enhancement Contracts (PECs) or Joint Activities Agreements (JAAs).

Stanislav Letyvniuk, Development Director of Kislotoupor Group, which was established in 1996, provided an overview of its mining activities in Ukraine. Kislotoupor has been operating in Ukraine for the last 24 years producing and supplying clay, gypsum, and other raw materials for glass production. The Company has completed 7 successful projects in the mining industry 4 of which where greenfield. The production has been exported to more than 10 countries, including countries in Europe, Asia, and the CIS countries. The Company has started a collaboration with customers in North America. In addition, the Company offers consulting services in the areas of deposit analysis, from exploration to the preparation of a business plan and project support.

CUCC’s plan is to hold a similar event next year at PDAC 2021.

All speakers presentations are available on the CUTIS Trade & Investment Portal