Теги: Ukraine
Investor looks for a project on top of trends

Beehive is a leading Ukrainian producer and exporter of honey. The geography of the company’s sales is very broad and includes such advanced markets as the USA, Germany, Denmark and Canada. In November last year, Beehive took part in the first investment forum – CUTIS Investment Roadshow

Ihor Liski, co-founder of the Ukrainian Institute for the Future (UIF), chairman of the board of directors of the Effective Investments Holding (of which Beehive is a part) explained why Canadians are cautious about implementing investment projects in Ukraine

Currently, all challenges create more opportunities for us than during all previous years of independence. Like never before, we need to prove our ability to work within the international business community.

Professional teams, ambitious projects and bold decisions spring up in Ukraine but nowadays this is rather an exception. The country is changing, people are looking where to apply their talents, and many think that the system of rating has not changed. If we want to compete with the rest of the world, we do not have to be afraid to surprise it with our knowledge, skills and ideas.

At least, some reforms have helped to intensify work with investors in Ukraine. There are investment forums at the regional level and legislative drafts to increase the country’s investment attractiveness. I’m sure that investors see this. That is why we are witnessing a new wave of interest in domestic projects. The main thing, however, is that Ukrainian entrepreneurs can realize their own ambitions. Still, you have to understand whether you have them. Successful projects do exist, but they are created mainly by young entrepreneurs oriented to exports and international trends.

The main thing has changed: investors are looking for a project that follows the calls of time. Thus, when creating a modern honey plant, we understood that it was in demand. High-quality food from environmentally friendly regions is a global trend, and we follow it. When Beehive understands its own significance for the whole industry and the country in general, the entire company moves forward. Only a combination of technology, teamwork and long-term trend analysis can provide solutions for narrow-focused tasks and make investors interested.

If we talk about the interest of international investors 10 years ago, one could say that money would flow like a river.

However, investors are changing, they are interested in new areas and become much more demanding, while Ukrainians in the meantime may have little to offer. Canadian investors know and understand our country very well. Having experience of work with domestic projects and knowing all the risks of such cooperation they invest with caution.

It’s hard to find a worthwhile project with real efficiency rather than drawn up in a business plan. I myself reject a lot of such projects almost every day. Ukrainian businesspeople should be more courageous and aggressive, learn to do international business. We must satisfy our hunger for knowledge, find new production technologies, learn to present our achievements. In addition to this, the world is changing, trendy global solutions become promising: green energy, circular economy projects, creative industry will be getting investments from now on.

Investors are now very demanding about Ukrainian projects because there are high risk factors: war, corruption and slow reforms.

A mere lack of trust in both the country and the principles of doing business in it. Entrepreneurs can change this attitude only with their own example and honest projects. In our company, we have been doing this for many years. Only the desire to live and work in Ukraine forces us to return to this endless work again and again. To create investment attractive business, to implement ideas that are crazy at first glance – this is the task of my company. No one can convince me that it is impossible to make a successful project now and attract investors from all over the world to Ukraine.

Footwear manufacturer KaDar: We have successfully fulfilled our first order for the Canadian market

The history of KaDar, the largest footwear manufacturer in Western Ukraine, began back in 1999. At the moment, the production capacity enables the company to produce about 500 pairs of shoes per day. KaDar is actively entering new markets including the Canadian market. Halyna Panas, KaDar Export Development Manager, tells about the company’s preparation for the international exhibition – Toronto Shoe Show and its first results.    

KaDar has been successfully operating in the Ukrainian market for over 20 years and exporting its products to EU countries for more than 5 years.

The Free Trade Agreement between Canada and Ukraine gave us an excellent opportunity to supply footwear to Canadian consumers at zero import duty rate.

Due to our cooperation with the CUTIS project, we were able to participate in the Toronto Shoe Show, as it is a good opportunity to showcase our products to key players in the Canadian market. The first exhibition was held in late August 2018, the next one – on 20-22 February this year.

When preparing for the first exhibition, we did not understand exactly what shoes should be shown to Canadian clients. After all, Ukraine and Canada have their own specific tastes, preferences, and trends. Not always trendy models of footwear in Ukraine will be in demand in Canada, and vice versa. Therefore, it was not easy for us to prepare for the August exhibition and decide on the product mix.

We are now much better aware of what Canadian consumers need. The first exhibition and meeting with potential customers, talks with importers helped us understand the needs and requirements of the Canadian market.

That is why, when preparing for the second exhibition (February 2019), we were quite savvy in terms of mix, requirements and product quality. We brought exactly the products that might be of interest to potential consumers in Canada.

We see good prospects of exporting KaDar shoes to Canada as we got positive feedback on our products. Expectations are positive, we want to find a good business partner for long-term and mutually beneficial cooperation.

We already have our first order that we successfully completed. We work on further orders, prepare a collection in accordance with the requirements of the Canadian market.

We hope for successful exports to Canada. We want Canadian consumers to appreciate the high quality of shoes by the Ukrainian manufacturer and believe in the potential successful cooperation with our company. The most important reward for us will be the customer’s appreciation and recognition of the company as a reliable business partner.

Find out more about the success of Ukrainian producers at Toronto Shoe Show by following the link

Stepan Kubiv: Ukraine and Canada’s extraordinary business relationship is just getting started

Stepan Kubiv, First Vice Prime Minister and Minister of Economic Development and Trade for Ukraine, special for Financial Post (Canada) 

Ukraine is a trusted friend and partner for Canada. Our relationship spans more than a century of shared family, cultural and political connections. The next step in our ongoing journey together is in expanding our business relationships.

While Ukraine gained its formal independence in 1991, our country is just three years into the rebirth that resulted from the Revolution of Dignity in 2014. Since the Euromaidan, we have set out to build a new European state. We signed a Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Area agreement with the European Union in 2016, and the Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement (CUFTA) last year — deals that effectively create an uninterrupted duty-free trade zone comprising almost 600 million consumers.

Starting in 2016, our economy has rebounded with 10 consecutive quarters of positive economic growth, including growth of up to 3.8 per cent in the second quarter of 2018.

Even though CUFTA took effect only in August 2017, total Canada-Ukraine goods trade in 2017 grew by 42 per cent to US$349.6 million. A further year-over-year increase of 2.7 per cent was recorded in the first seven months of 2018.

Our trade strategy is combined with an ambitious economic reform program to make Ukraine more attractive to western investment. Since 2014, we have achieved more reforms than at any time since independence. We have deregulated sectors of the economy, streamlined business regulations and undertaken privatization of state-owned enterprises. Reforms are underway to improve creditors’ rights and intellectual property rights. As of July 1, 2018, the total volume of direct foreign investment amounted to US$40.7 billion.

Ukraine is committed to fighting corruption through new legislation, government systems and institutions. The centrepiece of our commitment is the High Anti-Corruption Court, which began in June. International bodies, such as the G7 and the International Monetary Fund, have endorsed the court as a significant step in achieving our anti-corruption objectives.

The next step is expanding our business relationships

These initiatives to improve the investment climate are paying off. Canadian investment in Ukraine increased 20.9 per cent in 2017, and was up 21.6 per cent in the first half of 2018 compared to the same period one year earlier. We are focusing on four sectors: agro-industry, information technology, infrastructure and natural resources. Canadian firms have expertise in each of these sectors and opportunities are opening in Ukraine for potentially lucrative investments. Our trade and investment promotion efforts are therefore concentrated in these business sectors.

Ukraine’s IT industry has transformed rapidly from a fringe economic player to to the country’s third-largest export sector in only five years. In 2017, IT services grew by 20 per cent and exports are estimated to double in the next five years. The IT sector comprised about 61 per cent of Ukraine’s services exports to Canada in 2017.

Our geographic location gives us the potential to be a trade and transportation hub for Europe, the Middle East and Asia. Our road, rail, aviation and marine infrastructure is well developed, but much of it needs renovation, upgrades and modernization, creating opportunities for Canadian investors.

Ukraine is pursuing a goal of energy independence by 2020, opening up opportunities for Canadian companies to help by investing and building infrastructure in both traditional energy segments and for renewables, such as solar, wind and bioenergy. In June, Canada and Ukraine signed a letter of intent on energy co-operation with the International Centre of Regulatory Excellence (ICORE), a not-for-profit organization founded by the Alberta Energy Regulator, to bolster transparency and regulatory excellence.

While it is still early days for new investments, the shovels already in the ground provide an indication that opportunities abound. TIU Canada is constructing a new solar power plant near the village of Kalinovka in the Mykolaiv region. Brookfield Asset Management is a backer of the Innovation District IT Park now under construction in Lviv. Fairfax Financial Holdings Ltd. is a significant investor in Astarta Holding, an agroindustrial holding company. And investment is flowing the other direction as well: Ukrainian investors broke ground in September for the Canada Meat Group Inc. meat-processing plant and cold storage facility in North Bay, Ont.

Ukraine greatly values the support that Canada provides — as a partner for peace, a provider of development assistance through the Canada-Ukraine Trade & Investment Support Project, and shared deep cultural connections. Canada has graciously offered to host the annual Ukraine Reform Conference in June 2019 , and we will welcome the opportunity to describe additional positive momentum.

Ukrainians want a democratic, reliable, and economically strong country. With Canada’s help, we will continue our efforts to deliver it for our mutual benefit.

Source: Financial Post

4 leading Ukrainian industries to invest – webinars
  1. Agriculture industry

Agriculture is one of the leading sectors of the Ukrainian economy. In 2016, the sector’s share amounted to 13.7% of the GDP of the country and 14.2% in 2015. Its share along with the food industry is more than 18% of the gross domestic product of Ukraine.

Participants:

  1. Olga Trofimtseva, Deputy Minister of Agrarian Policy and Food of Ukraine
  2. Bohdan Leshchyshen, CUTIS Canadian Project Director

Moderator: Mark Markevych, President of Crossways MK Consulting

  1. Energy industry

The energy industry is composed of oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear and hydropower, wind and solar. The basis of the energy industry is electricity. The power generating capacity of wholesale electricity market in Ukraine is nuclear, thermal, hydro and alternative energy with an installed capacity of about 52,730 MW. The average annual production of electricity is about 195.5 billion kWh. In 2016, Ukraine exported 520,600 tons of coal with a total value of $44.8 million. In 2016, Ukraine exported 233,587 tons of petroleum products with a total value of $86.5 billion.

Participants:

  1. Nataliya Boyko, Deputy Minister of Energy and Coal Industry of Ukraine
  2. Bohdan Leshchyshen, CUTIS Canadian Project Director

Moderator: Mark Markevych, President of Crossways MK Consulting

  1. Infrastructure and Logistics industry

The Infrastructure and Logistics industry is dependent on a strong transport sector. The Ukrainian transport sector has five transport modes: road rail, maritime, inland waterway and air transport. The transport sector of Ukraine includes: 22,000 km of railway routes, 170,000 km of automobile roads, 2,200 km of navigable waterways, 13 seaports, 4 fishing ports, 11 rivers terminals, and 21 airports. Transport, storage, postal and courier activity represents 6.6% of Ukraine’s GDP and employs 1 million people. In 2015, transport industry had estimated revenues of US$11.5 billion (5.1% of the business revenues in Ukraine).

Participants:

  1. Viktor Dovgan, Deputy Minister of Infrastructure of Ukraine
  2. Bohdan Leshchyshen, CUTIS Canadian Project Director

Moderator: Mark Markevych, President of Crossways MK Consulting

  1. IT & Telecom industry

IT segments (software development + computer hardware) and Telecom (communications services, including the Internet) had estimated revenues of US3.6 billion and grew by 22% in 2016. The major revenue components of the IT segment are computer equipment – 83%, IT services – 19% and packaged software – 7%.

Participants:

  1. Mikhail Titarchuk, Deputy Minister of Economic Development and Trade of Ukraine
  2. Bohdan Leshchyshen, CUTIS Canadian Project Director

Moderator: Mark Markevych, President of Crossways MK Consulting

Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Zone: Half a year of agricultural exports – where are we now?

In summer 2017 Canada and Ukraine agreed on free trade area relations. What has changed in agricultural trade since that time?

Surely, free trade agreement between two countries reveals huge opportunities for Ukrainian agricultural producers. Finally, they have got access to vast and diverse Canadian consumer market.

Canada has agreed to reduce a majority of duty rates all the way down to 0% for Ukrainian agricultural entrepreneurs. But tariff-rate quotas, which were applied earlier to 108 goods and products, are still in force. In its turn, Ukraine, seeking to protect domestically-produced products from highly competitive imports, will incrementally abolish custom fees for Canadian companies in the next 3-5 and 7 years. These measures are taken to help domestic producers stay in business.

Free trade deal signing brings major changes for Ukrainian agricultural sector. On one hand, they are able to freely import their goods to Canada, but on the other, the product quality must be high and they should meet strict requirements in multiple stage quality control procedure. Despite this, far from everyone will take advantage that is offered by such cooperation.

Immigrants create a demand

With its hidden pitfalls Canada consumer market is really hard area to bring exported food products to. Over the last few years increase in Canadian population is drastically low. This is the reason of tightening food quality regulations. In Canada the most widely consumed products are meat, processed meat products, wheat, and processed wheat products. These products are produced in abundance by Canadian agricultural entrepreneurs – the mentioned niche is already full and there is hardly any place for Ukrainian grain crop exporters there.

“In spite of such complicated background there is always a way out,” says Paul Darby, CUTIS Project Manager and Executive Director International Partnerships at The Conference Board of Canada. Immigrants from various countries, including Ukraine, represent a significant part of the Canadian population and create strong demand for food product diversity. Niche product export is thought to be a high-potential growth area.

“In Canada supermarket food product offerings include frozen vareniki, but they are imported from USA. Why would not Ukrainian entrepreneurs take this niche?” says Paul Darby. As he explains, supermarket shelves are rich with variety of traditional food products.

Taking into account the fact, that in Canada live more than 1.5 million of Ukrainians, national agricultural producer products will be in great demand with this ethnic group. Zenon Poticzny, President at Canada-Ukraine Chamber of Commerce, believes that the majority of such products can be labeled organic. “For example, birch water for export is justly considered organic, and large retailer chains willingly sell such products,” points Zenon Poticzny.

Ukrainian entrepreneurs activities shall comply with a number of import and export regulatory requirements, which makes go-to-market a bit complicated but there are niches that Ukrainian products will fit well. It should be noted that premium segment is expending rapidly. This trend should not be underrated while choosing products for export. It means that in the coming years demand on fresh and frozen vegetables, fruits, organic and natural products, juices and preserved food will grow among Canadian consumers. Single-serving buys as well are getting more popular. This is another point to consider attentively.

Not everybody can succeed

Despite free trade agreement and huge food market, exporting goods to Canada is a challenge. Canadian Border Service Agency has some similar functions as the State Committee of Ukraine for Technical Regulation and Consumer Policy renders. It is responsible for various imported food, plant and animal (FPA) products checking. If any sanitary and phytosanitary issue arises, it can cause damage to country image.

Let’s say Ukrainian products are certified by the state control agencies. At this point it is worth noting that supply to retailer chains is another question to solve. Most of the food products (up to 60%) are offered by supermarkets, so independent shops and smaller retail chain share gets lower. Producers should focus on trade relations establishment. Only this way their products can be seen and chosen by Canadian consumers. Canadian multinational retail companies do not spend much time on discussions; they tend to work directly with the agricultural producers, avoiding any third party involvement. Clients are interested not just in required certificates availability, but as well company reputation, social responsibility actions and business plan for future development. Local entrepreneurs must be ready to comply with them all.

Dmitriy Kozonak, Canada-Ukraine Chamber of Commerce member, is sure that Ukrainian agricultural producers success with foreign partners mainly depends on mere interest and genuine involvement. “Entrepreneurs should constantly actively communicate with partners, provide complete business information and express development vision,” explains Dmitriy Kozonak. As the expert sees current situation, the way of thinking prevents Ukrainian producers from confidently taking considerable Canada market share. “The majority of producers shows poor engagement strategy, they are self-assured and simply do not know what goods are in demand. Here is the problem,” adds up the expert.

Huge opportunities

Official figures show that in 2017 Ukraine agri-food exports were valued at $5.8 million, and processed vegetables (canned goods and juices) exports amounted from $83,000 to $2.5 million. Analysts forecast that Canada-Ukraine cooperation will induce agricultural export growth for another 3.5% each year. By various estimates almost 31% of Canadian consumer are willing to pay more for healthy food. It means that food processing entrepreneurs are in fortunate position that opens bigger opportunities for them.

Effective business cooperation with Canadian companies rely on some simple and easy-to-understand rules. Your company must comply with all the norms and regulations and have good reputation among foreign partners. By the way, these requirements are as well easy to fulfill since government agencies and trade associations are ready to give a helping hand. Moreover, all the necessary information can be found in the correspondent web resources.

The experts of CUTIS Project, which has been established under terms of the free trade zone agreement, provide substantial assistance to companies that are planning to export products to Canada. Canada Trade Facilitation Office is a provider of information and advice for small exporters in developing and emerging countries. This organization helps small business to come with their products to Canadian market.

Source: Agroportal.ua

Ihor Sanzharovskyi: Ukrainian producers should find their place on the Canadian market

Market analysis, certification, finding a partner in Canada and fluency in English are just a few of the key “must-haves” for the Ukrainian exporters to Canada. CUTIS project director Ihor Sanzharovskyi talked to UA TV about the crucial aspects of exporting to Canada.

The interview covers the structure of the Ukrainian exports to Canada, the main obstacles exporters face, free trade with Canada, and the prospects of bringing Canadian investments to Ukraine.

“The Canadian market is not empty, it does not simply wait for Ukrainian goods. Ukrainian producers need to find their place on the Canadian market and, let’s be honest, fight for the Canadian shelves,” said Mr Sanzharovsky.

Watch the full interview below:

Olga Vergeles: Canadian Supermarkets are Interested in Ukrainian Goods

The Parliament of Ukraine ratified the Canada Free Trade agreement on March, 14.Now, in order to become effective, the Agreement must be signed by the President of Ukraine, ratified by the Senate and signed by the Governor General of Canada. In a month after the ratification procedures are over the Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement becomes a reality. According to experts, it may happen in summer, 2017.

Last year a Canada-Ukraine project for trade and investment support (CUTIS) was launched in order to help Ukrainian companies to enter the Canadian market. The Project is financed by the Canadian government and aims at technical assistance to Ukrainian exporters. propozitsiya.com learned from CUTIS Project Manager Olha Vergeles, what preferences Ukrainian exporters are going to get after the markets are open and in what goods Canadian customers are interested the most.

Who and how will CUTIS assist?

— We have a very good cooperation with the Ministry of Economy of Ukraine, in particular, the team of the trade representative of Ukraine, Natalia Mykolska and Export Promotion Office at the ministry. Together we support small and medium Ukrainian businesses that plan to enter the markets of Canada. Big holdings are capable of hiring consultants and prepare themselves for entering the market while small businesses often lack knowledge and they don’t know what to start from.

A study is currently underway, on the basis of which five groups of goods and services will be selected, that are of the most interest to Canada as imports from Ukraine. CUTIS will be looking for the producers of these goods and invite them to participate in the project. We have planned seminars and information sessions covering the most important export issues. We will also provide technical assistance on packaging, labeling, certification and, most of all, assist in searching for partners, organize meetings. According to our plan, Ukrainian companies will participate in trade shows and exhibitions in Canada.

How will the 5 groups of priority goods be selected?

— The selection will be done in 2 phases. We have analyzed the dynamics of Ukrainian exports to Canada and Canadian imports in general, in order to find out, which goods are being actively imported by Canada with positive trends during the recent 5 years and in which of these groups Ukrainian producers can compete.

We also looked at export opportunities of Ukraine and excluded the categories that are inaccessible for small and medium businesses. At this point, we have already selected 9 groups of goods and one group of services. The next step is to define five priorities. However, keeping in mind the fast dynamics of export markets, we are prepared to reconsider the five priorities. Apart from that, we always support anyone who wants to export to Canada, even if the goods are not part of the five priorities.

Will there be the goods of the food industry included?

Chocolate and confectionaries, as well as processed and canned fruit and vegetables, food processing equipment (refrigerators, flouring mills, packaging equipment) are already on the top-10 list. The final data on the priority groups will be available in April 2017.

Has CUTIS been frequently approached?

— Yes, we are very active online and tell a lot about Canadian market, using all possible resources. I obtain 2-3 requests from various companies on a daily basis. We have been approached by vegetable and fruit producers and well as gardening businesses. Among the frequently asked questions are: how to find a partner, what Canadian customers are looking for, etc.

We plan a Ukrainian trade mission to Canada in April. The group has been joined by frozen fruit and vegetable producers. They have already got international certification and are prepared to meet with representatives of Canadian retail chains.

How can one start cooperating with the project?

— For the beginning I kindly ask to send a brief information on a company (titles, web page, the range of products, certificates available, the scope of production) – this enables us to collect a company profile, which is included in our database. The applications should be sent to the email address office@cutisproject.org.

We receive requests from Canadian chains occasionally. E.g. we have been approached by Canadian companies interested in leading Ukrainian producers of fresh vegetables and frozen fruit.

Have there been any success stories yet?

— CUTIS co-organized a Ukrainian-Canadian forum in June 2016. 93 meetings took place during the Forum, resulting in 4 signed contracts. A pilot office of one Ukrainian company has been opened in Canada. A Ukrainian producer of birch sap met with the representatives of the biggest Canadian chain of supermarkets. They entered into contractual negotiations, including discussions of insurance and the range of products.

Only 4 contracts have been signed as a follow-up of the Forum. Why so few?

— This is a very good number if you take into account high requirements and conservatism of Canadian market. There are some problems with communication and compliance to product requirements. A lot of Ukrainian companies are not ready to export: they seem to show interest, they write about the advantages of their products, send presentations. However, when asked if they are ready to modify their business for exports, the businessmen realize that they are not prepared for it so far.

What are the three major requirements for the products?

— Certification, the required volumes, and terms of delivery are the main ones.

Is this feasible for the products to get straight on the shelves of supermarkets?

— It is quite feasible. But one should have patience. We’ve been working with a number of powerful chains. They file their requests with product groups. Ukrainian companies also have to be prepared to produce under the private label, when goods, produced in Ukraine, are sold under Canadian brand. It is quite profitable for a Ukrainian producer, for Canadians have little knowledge of our brands, whereas launching ad campaigns is very expensive and doesn’t guarantee further sales.

Indeed, there is a powerful diaspora, who buy Ukrainian goods in small stores, but this isn’t a big Canadian market. End buyers don’t know a lot about Ukrainian goods. Apart from that, in order to supply branded products, there need to be large volumes delivered, which is not always affordable to small and medium-sized producers.

Which products are of demand in Canadian supermarkets?

— Primarily, frozen berries and vegetables. Processing companies are interested in fresh vegetables for further production of mixes, salads, sandwiches. Apples are potentially interesting, but it comes down to the price and logistics because Canada gets apples from nearer countries resulting in their relatively lower prices. We’ve been talking to a Ukrainian company, that wants to enter Canadian market with its fresh vegetables. They are aware that, in order to make this happen, they need to have a logistics center in Canada, where the vegetables are packaged and quickly distributed among relevant stores. This option is sensible from the exports stand point because small producers can be engaged in forming big batches to Canada if they are dictated the technology of growth or production.
What should one be prepared for when planning exports to Canada?

— There is a false impression that, once the meeting took place, the contract can be signed in a month. Developed markets don’t work this way. Negotiations often last up to one year. Canadians are very conservative. They want to contact one specific person. They build relationships and communications slowly. To be honest, nobody is looking forward to seeing us in Canada. Therefore, we have to promote our products.

What are other main mistakes of new exporters?

— If a company visited a conference or a forum, it doesn’t mean that they are going to get a flow of clients and contracts right after. This will not happen. They have to visit a few more forums. And not just they visit but also fix appointments beforehand. Because, by the way, big Canadian chains will not pay attention to the proposal sent to a general office address, even if all relevant certificates are available.

Exports take time, resources and energy. The main mistakes are a lack of strategy and financial calculations. For example, juice producers, we have been taking care of, lower the price for the sake of entering the Canadian market. However, they do not guarantee exclusive terms. The common issue and the major factor of entering the Canadian market are the search of a partner and building mutual understanding.

What are the specificities of Canadian business culture?

— Conservatism. Digital tools commonly used here are not so widespread there. And not because they cannot afford them, but because a telephone is a tool for conversation and nothing more. Therefore, during a business meeting, people don’t exchange email addresses to make things faster. Rather, a Canadian businessman comes back to his office, opens his mailbox and gets to your message, probably, the next day. If the information isn’t given in appropriate format, he will not open the file at all.

There are specific standards involved. Thus, you either follow them or you’re out. If a company has certain proposal review procedure, it will not make any exceptions. These are the things Ukrainians do not understand, because they think, “hey, they are Ukrainians too, so we always find common ground”. It all goes in a profound and consistent way, step by step, as it is supposed to be. This is a major difference and the first thing that needs to be considered. Nobody is going to meet with you without preliminary arrangements made, without company information and presentation.

Why is it worth to export to Canada

— This country depends on its imports, which comprise 31% of Canada’s GDP. The National diversity of Canada is also an advantage. Every 5th citizen of Canada was born outside the country. On top of that, Canada is a regional hub, from which one can enter the markets of the US and Mexico.

What advantages is the Free Trade Agreement going to bring?

— Canada provides full and instant access to its markets, which is zero custom rate for most of the goods. However, some of the goods will be subject to quotas. Ukraine will go through gradual liberalization process – 3 to 7 years. Ukraine will also use tariff quotas for some goods, in particular, for frozen pork and lard. Sugar is excluded from the terms of the Agreement.

The Agreement provides for the Parties to work towards mutual recognition of accreditation authorities. In medium terms this means that Canada acknowledges Ukrainian accreditation authority (National Accreditation Agency of Ukraine) and a Ukrainian producer doesn’t need to go through more expensive certification in Canada.

The Agreement contains provisions on public procurement. Canada spends almost CAD 15 billion on procurement and Ukrainian companies will become eligible to participate.

How will the quotas be administered?

— Limitations are applied to wheat, barley, poultry, dairy produce, eggs, cheese, and sugar. It applies to all countries, not just Ukraine, though. Some quotas are not taken up. For instance, only 54% of dry milk whey quota was taken up in 2015 marketing year. Within the quota, 0% duty rate is applied. The specificity of Canada is the responsibility for imports, including the quality of goods, getting a license to supply within the tariff quota, taken by the importer. Even if the goods are shipped with violations or don’t comply with customs regulations, all the fines and penalties will be charged on the importer. Therefore, when a Ukrainian importer finds a partner in Canada, the latter will tell him about all the details because he is primarily interested in having the goods complied with all the requirements and no violations. Administering quotas is also a responsibility of an importer.

As far as margarine, wheat and barley are concerned, it works on “first come – first served” basis. For other goods limited by quotas, a preliminary distribution principle applies, i.e. one need to get the right to supply product within the quota by filing a respective application. This is within the authority of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Canada.

Do European exporters use the resource of the Еxport help desk. Is there any similar resource in Canada?

— Using the resource of Automatic Importing Reference System, by the code of goods (4 digits) you can get all the compliance requirements for agricultural produce. It is worth pointing out the purpose of imports: participation in trade shows, sales. All this information is available on the web pages of Canadian state control authorities.

Are there any special requirements to packaging and labeling?

— They frequently forget that food product should be labeled in two languages, with none of the language given the priority, i.e. fonts and lay-outs should be equal. An interesting detail: an expiry date is put in a “reverse” order as for Ukraine: year, month and date. There is a list of acronyms of months – the mix of English and French. As far as the indication of the country of origin, there is a list of produce (wine, dairy produce, honey, fish, meat, eggs, fruit, and vegetables) which must contain this indication.

— Developed countries practice responsible consumption. Is this relevant to Canada too?

— 60% of Canadians consider themselves responsible consumers and over quarter of them are prepared to pay for additional environmental and social benefits, such as: equal employment opportunities for women, equal pay, no adverse environmental impact. Right environmental labeling can inform the consumer of the advantages.

Is organic produce also popular?

Canadian organic market is the world’s top fifth – around $5 billion. The best-sold produce are fresh fruit and vegetables. The volumes of Canadian organic imports are constantly growing. Thus, 20 million Canadians report buying organic food on a weekly basis. They are prepared to pay a higher price for organic produce. The margin may reach 90-300%. The biggest margins can be obtained on organic juices and yogurts. It is important to note, that American organic certificate is also valid in Canada.

How much will the exports grow after the market is open?

— We will not see the instant growth of exports in 2017 because of the specificity of Canadian business mentality and unpreparedness of Ukrainian companies to supply big volumes. Ukrainian counterparts will most likely become more active. At least a year is required to have a substantial shift.

Paul Darby: Free Trade may cause a rapid investment growth

It is possible that the Parliament of Canada will ratify Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement at its current session. This is the opinion by Paul Darby, the Canadian co-chair of Canada-Ukraine Trade and Investment Support project (CUTIS). He supervises the activities within the international technical assistance project aimed at increasing trade among Ukraine and Canada. The project entered its active phase after the Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement had been signed in July with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau involved.

Paul Darby: Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement was signed in summer 2016, and this is a clear indicator of how Canada treats economic relations with Ukraine.

We hope that the Parliament of Canada will ratify the Agreement in the course of the current parliamentary session, and we expect the same from the Ukrainian side.

Iryna Slavinska: Why has the Agreement been concluded? Is Ukraine such a promising economic partner?

Paul Darby: Yes, Ukraine is a bright example of a good country for Canadian investments. One should also remember about a huge Ukrainian minority in Canada that creates a lot of social and economic links among the countries.

Iryna Slavinska: It is obvious that signing of an agreement between Canada and Ukraine has a political dimension, isn’t it?

Paul Darby: Canada has always supported Ukraine; in particular, it was the first country to recognize independence of Ukraine, therefore, these links were always strong.

Iryna Slavinska: Can we predict any numbers regarding benefits Canada may get as a result of the Agreement signed with Ukraine?

Paul Darby: We have conducted an in-depth analysis survey regarding the impact of the Agreement over the economy of Ukraine. It has showed that the Trade Agreement will affect Ukraine’s GDP, taxes, jobs. There will be increase in jobs for Ukrainians related, in our opinion, to Canada’s investments to Ukraine. When we check similar Canada’s agreements with other countries, we see that it there is always a sharp increase in investments. And when the investments rise that high, they will stay at this level. We hope that it is just this sharp increase in investments that will occur in Ukraine.

The number of jobs for Ukrainians will increase due to Canadas investments to Ukraine

Iryna Slavinska: What are the Canadian goods that may be interesting and competitive in Ukraine and will Ukrainian products be able to win their respectable share so that to be present on Canadian supermarkets’ shelves?

Paul Darby: It is semi-finished goods, clothes, pumping machinery, various hardware, washing machines that may be interesting for Canada. In other words, we try to seek the goods with added value instead of focusing on raw materials.

We are also confident that Ukrainian confectionary goods and footwear will be popular at Canada market; they are highly competitive products.

Recently we also observe the growth in Canada’s demand for Ukraine’s IT services.

Our project funded by the Government of Canada will focus on the commodities and services like these with potential to be popular in Canada. But we shall be open to all companies. That means that, irrespective of your being selected or not for the final short list of the goods in the highest demand in Canada, the CUTIS project will be happy to provide you with assistance in terms of finding partners, buyers, trade fairs, clarifications on Canada’s regulations, etc.

This is a technical assistance project, and we shall be trying to reduce poverty in Ukraine by means of supporting, primarily, small and medium enterprises as they constitute the driver for the economy.

Iryna Slavinska: I have talked with some experts, and they underscore that Ukraine’s IT industry exports mostly raw staff –not the ready products.

Paul Darby: Yes, this is true. However, within the frame of our project we shall be seeking not only the companies that produce just coding for abroad; we shall be looking for those who develop ready products – specific applications and alike.

Iryna Slavinska: You have mentioned that you would provide support for small and medium enterprises, particularly in terms of opening access to the list of promising manufacturers or partners. Is there any procedure how it will work? What should an advice-seeker do?

Paul Darby: Our project has a representative office in Kyiv; you can find us on Facebook – CUTIS account; there is also the web site. Using these channels you may approach us with questions, particularly, Ihor Sanzharovsky, the Project Director in Ukraine.

The short-listed companies will be provided not just with advice. We are going to bring consultants from Canada so that they will hold training sessions with the selected companies to prepare their products for the Canadian market in cooperation with us. That means joint work to develop packaging, elaborate marketing strategies and the steps to meet Canadian standards.

The companies working in the selected areas will be even provided with an opportunity to visit Canada or USA.

Iryna Slavinska: What are the eligibility criteria for the companies to be short-listed?

Paul Darby: First, we are going to conduct a general analysis of the products and services, which may be interesting for Canada. Then we shall pick top-5 of products and services. The next step is that within this range of goods and services we are going to transparently choose the companies that will participate in our project.

The requirements to these companies will include the capacity to supply adequate volumes of goods for the Canada market. We shall also check whether the products of a company meet the environmental protection standards. The companies owned by women will be particularly focused by our project.

Iryna Slavinska: When should we expect that the Agreement will be ratified?

Paul Darby: It is a hard question; however, the Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement’s ratification is in the agenda of the Canada’s Parliament’s current session. The session meetings will be over by April-May 2017. We hope to see the Agreement ratified till Christmas.

Source: Hromadske Radio

Zenon Potoczny: Canada will help Ukrainian business people to enter Canadian market

In the course of the first official visit of Justin Trudeau, the Prime Minister of Canada, to Ukraine the final draft of the Agreement on creating Free Trade Area between Ukraine and Canada was signed at last. Remembering the current modest trade turnover, one should hardly expect any immediate benefits as a result of the Agreement, but in the long-term perspective, 500 billion Canadian market has got a lot of interesting things to offer to Ukrainian manufacturers.

Ukrinform talked about the new trade agreement and the specific aspects of bilateral economic relations with Zenon Potoczny, the President at Canada-Ukraine Chamber of Commerce and one of the most active lobbyists for trade facilitation among the countries

CHOOSING TOP-5 OF THE INDUSTRIES

– First of all, please tell us your evaluation regarding Canada-Ukraine Business Forum held in late June in Toronto?

– Very positive! The Forum was attended by a multitude of participants: more than 150 Ukrainian and 230 Canadian companies. Besides, high profile official delegations from both countries took part. All in all, everything went very well. Bilateral meetings deserve special mentioning. Business people literally were standing in queues to communicate with each other. This is a very good sign, confirming that there may be potential specific business deals.

Businessmen literally were standing in queues to communicate with each other.

– What specific deals are you referring to? What are the achievements of the Forum, in general?

– I can tell about my own organization. We signed the Memorandum on Cooperation with the Ministry of Economic Development of Ukraine, and we are going to work on promoting exports of Ukrainian goods and services to Canada as well as on analyzing the investment projects and engaging investors from Canada.

– As far as I understand, you are referring to CUTIS (Canada-Ukraine Trade and Investment Support project) aimed at promoting Ukrainian exports to Canada, aren’t you?

– Exactly. The Government of Canada allocated 13.6 million dollars to implement this project within 5 years. The project partners include Canada-Ukraine Chamber of Commerce, Conference Board of Canada and the Ministry of Economic Development and Trade of Ukraine. With this latter we are supposed to have consultations, provide recommendations and agree on our activities. In fact, Canada-Ukraine Business Forum was held under the auspices of CUTIS.

– So, do your plans include holding similar events in future to promote bilateral relations, especially Ukrainian exports?

– Yes, they do, we have these ideas. Generally speaking, CUTIS primary objective is to analyze Ukrainian economy in order to identify 4-5 areas that constitute the most interest for Canada from imports’ perspective. After we identify these fields, we shall choose specific Ukrainian companies ready to export. Also, we shall be able to train them, inform them about the local (Canadian) laws and policies, Canadian tax and other regulations, and, more broadly, to assist them in producing marketing strategies. Finally, we are going to bring the companies’ representatives with ready marketing offers to Canada as members of the trade missions. There they will have an opportunity to pitch their projects and services and to tell the potential clients about them.

– When shall we expect the first findings of the CUTIS surveys on perspective areas?

– The work will be started very soon and the first findings will be published in 6 months – 1 year.

HELPING UKRAINIAN EXPORTERS

– What are the prospects the FTA offers for Ukrainian manufacturers? Why does Ukraine need this Agreement?

– At present there are lot of customs duties that constitute the barriers for Ukraine-Canada trade. The FTA will remove 99% of these barriers. This will help both Ukrainian and Canadian companies significantly enhance their volumes of exports. However, the Agreement is not restricted to removing the customs duties; it will withdraw other trade barriers as well.

The Agreement is not restricted to removing the customs duties; it will withdraw other trade barriers as well

– Will the Ukrainian goods be able to compete realistically with Canadian ones, remembering the difference in standards and approaches to production in our countries?

– This is also a constituent part of the CUTIS project: within the frame of it we must help Ukrainian exporters to meet the regulatory requirements of Canada. If they succeed in meeting them, their products will enter the market.

– True, but whereas the FTA comes into force late this year, the change in standards may take years…

– The Agreement comes into force through its ratification by the Parliaments. However, we should start preparatory work right now. We are already in position to clarify the requirements of Canadian private and public sectors for Ukrainian companies. The sooner we start to work with Ukrainian exporters and train them the better. If we want to launch trade immediately after the Agreement’s ratification, one should not lose time now.

– Do you have concerns regarding potential harm to Ukrainian domestic producers as a result of opening the markets?

– Certain problems may occur, but if you check some examples globally, then, irrespectively of the countries having FTAs, in most cases they are mutually beneficial. Otherwise, such practices as free trade areas agreements simply would not exist.

TOUGH CANADIAN TARIFF RATE QUOTAS

– Does the FTA Agreement include provisions on changes in the sphere of investments?

– Yes, it does. In fact, the Agreement is quite comprehensive and does not include only goods, but also workforce exchange as well as other aspects of bilateral trade, such as customs’ documents. There are chapters on intellectual property and environmental issues. Besides, Ukrainian companies are provided with access to Canadian public procurement.

– The Government of Ukraine perceives IT as one of the most promising industries of Ukrainian economy. How do you evaluate the perspectives of Ukrainian IT industry in Canada?

There are a lot of Canadian companies that use the services of Ukrainian IT sector

– It is obvious that IT is a significant and successful sector in Ukraine and it will be very interesting to Canada. In fact, there are already a lot of Canadian companies using the services provided by Ukrainian IT sector; they place orders for Ukrainians to develop software and suggest other types of outsourcing activities. The Agreement also includes all these issues.

– Maybe it is too early to talk about that, but are there any discussions on amending the present Agreement or about signing a new broader one?

– So far everyone focuses on the valid agreement. However, in due course when we start to operate within its framework, there may be a need in some additions.

– Canada was quite skillful in introducing tariff rate quotas for the most successful Ukrainian exports, such as chicken meat or grain. Will this story with EU tariff rate quotas very quickly exhausted by Ukraine repeat in the case with Canada?

– It is true that tariff rate quotas have been set for some Ukrainian goods; but Canada practices this approach with all the countries. There were a lot of talks and discussions on this issue, but no other way out was identified. Hence, there will be tariff rate quotas for some goods and Ukrainian companies will have to fit into them.

THE WINDOW TO USA AND MEXICO

– What are the concerns the Canadian investors have when investing in Ukraine?

– First of all, it is corruption. However, despite the fact that it is not that easy, the situation is improving, especially in view of current Government’s resolute position. The overall situation is much better than it was 20 years ago. One more problem is about judiciary system, but here there are also hopes for positive changes related to the adoption on the new law.

– Are there any Ukrainian investments in Canada?

The sooner the FTA comes into force the earlier a nice window to USA opens

– There are small investments in the construction area, but I have not heard about any large-scale investments. There are also a lot of Ukrainian companies that have some unique inventions, and they try to open an office in Canada to sell these inventions here. Some businessmen even discuss the opportunities to start additional production here to enter the US market. So, the sooner the FTA comes into force the earlier a nice window to USA opens.

– You mean to say that Canada-Ukraine FTA may become a bridge for Ukrainian companies to reach the US and Mexico, don’t you?

– Yes, exactly. In due course the process will reach this stage; however, the US has not launched discussions with Ukraine on free trade yet, therefore, it is the FTA with Canada that opens up this window of opportunities for Ukraine. However, taking into account the rules on the country of origin, you will not be able just to transport goods from Canada to the US. If you want to reach huge NAFTA members’ markets, Ukrainians will have to produce their goods in Canada or assemble them there.

CANADIAN BUSINESS CONSERVATIVE STAND

– In Ukraine’s early years of independence, Canadian investors had some very negative experience in Ukraine. Has the situation changed now?

Ukraine has never been internationally interesting as a country to invest in, so you should inform Canadians about its strengths

– As soon as Ukraine became independent, numerous Canadian companies (most of them owned by the Canadians of Ukrainian descent) attempted to start doing business here. They wanted not only to make some money, but to help the country where their ancestors had been born. Unfortunately, these “pioneers” faced huge disappointment. As a result, the investments from Canada to Ukraine almost ceased to exist. When Kuchma was President, the Canada-Ukraine Chamber of Commerce had to even close down its office, because there was no investment base due to excessive practices of hostile takeovers and fraud. We resumed our work when Yushchenko was elected President. And we felt a new wave of interest within the recent years. The Forums like the one held in Toronto promote this interest, because Ukraine has never been internationally interesting as a country to invest in, so you should inform Canadians about its strengths. Unfortunately, many businessmen think that occupation of Crimea and the war in the East makes it dangerous to stay at the most of Ukraine’s territory.

– What is the image of Ukraine as viewed by Canadian business community currently? Has the country managed to improve it?

– Indeed, the political situation’s change in Ukraine influenced its image beneficially. At present the democracy level is much higher than it was earlier. Every TV channel broadcasts journalist investigations. The schemes are revealed: the country’s transparency is rising. This helps not only average citizens, but businesses as well: they feel that they are able to expose their problems for the public, and they are not afraid of this.

– Why is the Canada-Ukraine trade turnover so low then; 280 million dollars per year for such countries is a very small sum.

– Canadian businessmen are quite conservative. If you want to draw their attention, the investment climate inside the country must be better. However, in due time, after the FTA Agreement is ratified, the mutual trade and investments will grow.

– Has the Canadian investors’ interest in Ukraine grown after FTA Agreement was signed this year?

– Yes, the mutual interest has grown. The number of CUCC members has significantly increased both in Ukraine and Canada.

THE ART “TO SELL”

– What objectives does the CUCC set and how does it reach these objectives?

– Our key role is to promote trade relations among two countries. We provide advice on search of business partners, facilitate dialogue among businessmen, we are looking for interesting Ukrainian projects, which are not currently fit to be presented for an investor. We can help with finishing a presentation, developing a business plan, make calculations and present the project in the best possible way. Our organization also fixes up workshops, business meetings, group visits from Ukraine, etc.

– How often do businessmen approach you to get advice?

Launching FTA is a priority for the Government of Canada. And for the Government of Ukraine as well

– We are receiving a lot of various proposals; most of them are not even ready to be presented, because Ukrainian companies often do not know how to “sell” themselves to an investor. We focus on small and medium sized companies, because it is the sector that is able to improve the well-being of the people. The large rich companies order perfect investment proposals themselves, they have no need in a chamber of commerce.

– Why did the FTA negotiations take such a long time – seven years?

– I assume that taking into account the trade turnover among the countries, FTA was not a priority. On the other side, this Agreement may be viewed as an attempt of Canadian Government to help Ukraine, because within recent two years the negotiations were very intense. In contrast, in Yanukovych times the dialogue was almost stopped. At present, Justin Trudeau said that FTA’s launch will be a priority for the Government. We hear the same comments from the Ukrainian side; thus the process is likely to accelerate.

Source: Ukrinform / Maksym Nalyvayko, Ottawa – Kyiv

Photo: Oleksiy Kovalyov, Yuriy Rylchuk / Ukrinform.

Paul Darby: Canada seeks Ukrainian exporters who will be able to succeed overseas

With the financial support provided by the Government of Canada the Сonference Board of Canada, a research organization, launches a project to identify the Ukrainian companies with potential capacity to export goods to Canada. Paul Darby, CBC, told Delo.UA whom they intend to find and what they are going to do for that.

There are a lot of reasons why we have started this project. There are a lot of Ukrainians in Canada: Ukrainian diaspora is 1.3 million people. Certainly, they are interested in working with Ukraine. Besides, currently Ukraine-Russia relations are tense. Ukraine seeks new markets for its exports, and we are ready to help, because Canada is one of such potential markets. In my view, at present the project is even more timely than if we had launched it 3-4 years ago.

We have signed an agreement with the Ukrainian Chamber of Trade and Commerce and the Government of Canada on the launch of the project aimed at increasing Ukrainian exports to Canada as well as increasing investments from Canada to Ukraine. The project is scheduled for five years. We are at the very initial phase now, and so far we conduct meetings with various organizations and are taking a closer look at local producing companies.

As soon as we finish our survey, we shall be informed which products we are going to focus on; then we shall start choosing specific producing companies. We must understand where exactly the goods are produced. Therefore, we are going to work with the companies based in regions and involve local organizations and chambers of commerce to conduct trainings.

But, I am certain that we are willing to find the companies whose products include specific added value. You see, surely enough, one can sell honey somewhere abroad at a ridiculously low price. Instead, one can sell beauty care products made with honey, and one is supposed to make much more money on selling these products than just honey.

Our key partner is the Ministry of Economic Development and Trade.  But we also work with private sector organizations, e.g. regional chambers of commerce. In future we plan to cooperate in some areas through partnerships with training organizations and universities that would contribute to transferring the knowledge to small and medium businesses’ owners.

Our target audience is the small businesses with prospects for exports to Canada.

Additionally, we are going to provide technical assistance. First, it is about packaging, marketing staff to sell the goods for Canadians, providing advice on Canadians’ quality requirements. Besides, it is about conducting trainings to train the individuals who will be helping local exporters to enter the external markets.

We plan to spend around 1 year to study the Ukrainian market in order to understand which products will sell well in Canada and which companies are fit to do exports. Our mission is just the first step. Then through analysis of the collected data we need to specify how the project shall be developing in future. It will take around two months. After that, by around June, the project will start to work in its entirety: the key activities will commence and financial support will be provided.

It is the Government of Canada that finances the project, but the private sector is supposed to share some expenditures. Within the frame of the project we plan to bring the companies to Canada to attend various events, trade shows, organize b2b events. The companies will have to cover some of the expenses to travel there. We do not know yet which share of the expenses must be covered by the companies: maybe it will be 50/50, or maybe they will cover 1/3 or 2/3 of the costs. It will depend on the sector where the company works, the type of business and products we shall choose as well as their prospective chances for success. However, the companies will have to cover at least 1/3 of the costs, anyway. The project’s total budget is 13 million CAD.

One of the objectives we are addressing within this mission is to meet other donor organizations. We have already had a meeting with the EBRD and we are considering the opportunities to cooperate with them to this or that extent. We already spoke with them about this, but we have not reached any specific decisions yet. However, there are areas where our cooperation with EBRD might appear efficient.

EBRD works on use of EU funding to support private sector, but they do not always focus specifically on exports, they concentrate on support for local producers’ development. We are interested in cooperating with them as partners who are able to help with developing local manufacturers and prepare them for exports activities.

More information on participating in the project is available through sending an e-mail – isanzharovskyi@yahoo.com – to Ihor Sanzharovsky, the project director in Ukraine.

If you want to provide information about you for the project, you should include the following data while sending an e-mail to this address: the name of your company; the name of an owner/chief executive officer; contact info; what your company’s products are, your production volumes; whether you have an experience in exporting your products and why will your product be a success at the market of Canada.